Tying Scott's Dead Scud—Tutorial

Everybody who fishes the White River tailwaters has a favorite scud pattern. One I like to tie and fish is a dead scud. The tiny crustaceans turn a funny pinkish orange color when they die (see photo #44 in the 2008 gallery). This is a humpback, weighted version. Several people have asked for a tutorial, so here it is.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Scott's Dead Scud
Hook 2x long nymph hook, size 14
Thread Orange Fly Master Plus
Weight Larva Lace LED cut into triangular shapes to match hook shank length
Body Orange synthetic/squirrel blend
Tail Wood duck flank fibers, tied downward into bend of hook
Shellback 1/4 inch scudback
Rib Fine silver wire

You are going to tie a humpback scud. I use curved scissors to cut the LED lead strip into triangle pieces. I also make one side of the triangle steeper and shorter than the other two sides. The short side I usually place toward the eye of the hook, and the longer, uncut base rests on the shank. This makes a slightly longer taper for the back end.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Lay a base of thread, and then tie in the duck fibers which you should have rolled in your fingers. The first wrap goes over the fibers into the bend of the hook. This makes sure the fibers splay and point downward.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Trim the end of the scud back to a middle point. This makes an easy place for the thread to grab when you tie it in. Stretch it slightly back as you tie it in down to the start of the duck fibers.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Now tie in the silver wire which will serve as the ribbing.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Bring the thread forward and catch the front shoulder of the lead triangle. Leave an eye width.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Lash it down securely.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Prepare the thread with dubbing and dub the body, making the contour shape you want.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Stretch the scud back forward and tie off. It may be helpful here to throw in a half-hitch to help prevent the scud back from slipping back through when you trim it.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Stretch the scud back up slightly and use scissors or a razor blade to trim the scud back close to the thread.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Rib the fly with the wire and whip finish the head. I usually try for about 5 wraps with the ribbing.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

Pick out the dubbing underneath using a brush tool or bodkin.

© Scott Branyan, www.flyflinger.com

 

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